August Releases

Posted on 31 July 2019 Wednesday


1 Aug They Could Have Named Her Anything by Stephanie Jimenez. Little A. ages 12-18
Every morning, seventeen-year-old Maria Anís Rosario takes the subway an hour from her boisterous and close-knit family in Queens to her private high school on the Upper East Side, where she struggles to fit in as one of the only Latina students—until Rocky welcomes her into this new life. White, rebellious, and ignored by her wealthy parents, Rocky uses her money toward one goal: to get away with anything. To Maria, it’s a dazzling privilege.

As a bond develops between these unlikely friends, neither can see what they share most—jealousy and the desire for each other’s lives. But crackling under the surface of their seemingly supportive alliance, the girls begin to commit little betrayals as they strive to get closer to their ideals regardless of the consequences.

6  Aug I’m Not Dying with You Tonight by Gilly Segal and Kimberly Jones. Sourcebooks Fire.
Told from two viewpoints, Atlanta high school seniors Lena and Campbell, one black, one white, must rely on each other to survive after a football rivalry escalates into a riot.

6 Aug Each Tiny Spark by Pablo Cartaya. Penguin.
Emilia Torres has a wandering mind. It’s hard for her to follow along at school, and sometimes she forgets to do what her mom or abuela asks. But she remembers what matters: a time when her family was whole and home made sense. When Dad returns from deployment, Emilia expects that her life will get back to normal. Instead, it unravels. Dad shuts himself in the back stall of their family’s auto shop to work on an old car. Emilia peeks in on him daily, mesmerized by his welder. One day, Dad calls Emilia over. Then, he teaches her how to weld. And over time, flickers of her old dad reappear.

But as Emilia finds a way to repair the relationship with her father at home, her community ruptures with some of her classmates, like her best friend, Gus, at the center of the conflict.

6 Aug Golden Like Summer by Gene Gant. DreamSpinner Press.
When he escapes the abusive man he calls Pa, Joey thinks his nightmare is over. Instead, a new one begins. The police don’t buy Joey’s story about the six-year-old boy he saved from Pa during his escape . Suddenly he’s being accused of a crime, threatened, and shown firsthand how the criminal justice system treats a black teen with no resources. After making another escape, Joey gives himself a new name, Alan, and starts a new life living in an abandoned house. Then he meets Desi, another homeless boy.

Though their mutual attraction grows into deeper feelings, Alan’s ordeal has left him afraid of physical love. Still, he’s determined to save Desi from the older teen who’s pimping him out. But in confronting the pimp, Alan and Desi may find themselves in trouble with the law again, a situation that could forever tear them apart.

6 Aug Sam Wu is Not Afraid of the Dark (Sam Wu series) by Katie Tsang, Kevin Tsang and Nathan Reed. Sterling Children’s Books.
Sam Wu is NOT afraid of the dark—but proving how brave you are is hard work. Especially when Sam’s about to face his greatest challenge yet: a camping trip in the woods with his best friend, Bernard, Bernard’s dad, and Sam’s annoying cousin from Hong Kong. That means confronting all kinds of terrifying things, like grizzly bears, vampire bats, werewolves, aliens, and most horrible of all . . . Ralph ZInkerman, the worst person in the WHOLE UNIVERSE! But when something strange starts haunting the woods, can Sam and his crew band together to become Masters of the Dark? And could they even have FUN?

13 Aug  The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee. G. P. Putnam’s Sons.
By day, seventeen-year-old Jo Kuan works as a lady’s maid for the cruel daughter of one of the wealthiest men in Atlanta. But by night, Jo moonlights as the pseudonymous author of a newspaper advice column for the genteel Southern lady, “Dear Miss Sweetie.” When her column becomes wildly popular, she uses the power of the pen to address some of society’s ills, but she’s not prepared for the backlash that follows when her column challenges fixed ideas about race and gender. While her opponents clamor to uncover the secret identity of Miss Sweetie, a mysterious letter sets Jo off on a search for her own past and the parents who abandoned her as a baby. But when her efforts put her in the crosshairs of Atlanta’s most notorious criminal, Jo must decide whether she, a girl used to living in the shadows, is ready to step into the light.

20 Aug Color Me In by Natasha Diaz. Delacorte. DEBUT AUTHOR
A YA novel based on the author’s own story, is about a mixed-race Jewish girl as she faces coming-of-age issues before she has decided who she is and where she fits within her two very different worlds—one in Harlem and the other in Westchester County.

20 Aug The Revolution of Birdie Randolph by Brandy Colbert. Little, Brown.
Sixteen-year-old Dove “Birdie” Randolph’s close bond with her parents is threatened by a family secret, and by hiding her relationship with Booker, who has been in juvenile detention.

26 Aug The Fresh New Face of Griselda by Jennifer Torres. Little, Brown.
After her father’s landscaping business fails and the family loses their house, sixth-grader Griselda Zaragoza follows her sister’s example and begins selling Alma cosmetics while hiding her changed circumstances from friends.

27 Aug Trans + : Love, Sex, Romance and Being You by Kathryn Gonzales and Karen Rayne. Magination Press.
An all-inclusive, uncensored guide for teens who are transgender, nonbinary, gender-nonconforming, or gender-fluid. TRANS+ answers all your questions, easy and hard, about gender and covers mental health, physical health and reproduction, transitioning, relationships, sex, and life as a trans or nonbinary individual. It’s full of essential information you need — and want — to know and includes real-life stories from teens like you!

27 Aug My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich by Ibi Zoboi and Frank Morrison. Dutton Books.
In the summer of 1984, twelve-year-old Ebony-Grace of Huntsville, Alabama, visits her father in Harlem, where her fascination with outer space and science fiction interfere with her finding acceptance.

27 Aug Count Me In by Varsha Bajaj. Nancy Paulsen Books. Middle Grade Debut
Told from two viewpoints, sixth-graders Karina and Chris use social media to stand up to racism in Houston, Texas, after an attack puts Karina’s Indian American grandfather in the hospital.

27 Aug The Battle (The Gauntlet) by Karuna Riazi. Salaam Reads.
A virtual reality game freezes time in New York City and thrusts twelve-year-old Ahmad Mirza and his classmate, Winnie, into the game world of Paheli, where they must overcome the Mastermind and the Architect.

29 Aug Dough Boys by Paula Chase. Greenwillow. ages 8-12
Told in two voices, thirteen-year-old best friends Simp and Rollie play on a basketball team in their housing project, but Rollie dreams of being a drummer and Simp, to impress the gang leader, Coach Tez.

Posted in: Me Being Me